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The Burpee: The Various Techniques Used by the Pros

The Burpee: The Various Techniques Used by the Pros

The Burpee: The Various Techniques Used by the Pros

By: Michael J. Carey

What Is A Burpee?

A burpee is a type of exercise performed with one or two feet on a platform (or floor) while using both hands to pull yourself up into an upright position. There are many variations of this basic exercise, but all involve pulling your body up off the ground and then back down again.

How Do You Perform A Burpee?

You perform a burpee by pushing your legs apart and raising them up toward the ceiling. Then, you push your knees together and pull yourself back down until you’re standing upright. Your arms should remain straight throughout the movement. When performing a full burpee, it’s best to keep your head facing forward so that you don’t have to bend over backward at any point during the move.

Why Should I Do A Burpee?

Burpees are great for building strength, flexibility, balance and coordination. They also improve lung capacity and aerobic endurance. Plus, they’re fun! If you’ve ever wanted to try something new like jumping rope or even swimming laps without getting wet, a burpee will give you a good workout. And if you’re just looking to get fit and stay healthy, then a burpee is definitely worth doing!

What Are The Different Types Of Burpees?

There are a variety of different types of burpees that you can try out whenever you get the chance. Each one targets different parts of your body and focus on different things. As always, make sure to consult your doctor before beginning any type of exercise routine.

The Basic Burpee: This is the original version of the burpee, which was mentioned in the opening paragraph. It’s a great way to start and end your routine.

The One-Foot Burpee: This is a basic burpee except you don’t put either of your legs on the ground. Instead, you jump from a standing position and place one foot in the air. Then, you bring that same foot down into a lunge position while your other leg stays raised in the air. From there, you perform the same actions as a basic burpee.

The One-Legged Burpee: This is a little different from the one-foot version in that you’re going to put one leg on the ground while your other leg stays raised up in the air. This requires more balance than the other forms of this exercise and can help improve your coordination as well.

The Hand Release Burpee: This is a great way of building up your strength in your arms and shoulders. It’s a little more difficult than the other types of burpees because you’ll be releasing your hands from the floor. You do this by putting your hands on the floor with your palms facing down toward the ground. Then, you jump up while raising your knees and bringing your legs together.

Finally, you push yourself as high into the air as you can.

The Pike Burpee: This is a great way of working on your flexibility and stretching out your lower back, hips and hamstrings. It’s similar to the basic form of the burpee except you bring your legs above your head before jumping up into the air. It may take some time for you to get used to this movement but it’s definitely worth it in the long run.

The Hanging Burpee: This type of burpee is exactly like the regular one with two exceptions. The first is that you’ll start the exercise by holding on to something sturdy, like a pull-up bar. The second difference is that you’ll end the exercise by pulling yourself back up to the starting position. This is a good way of helping you get used to doing a complete burpee.

The Handicap Burpee: This form of burpee is designed to make you work even harder by putting more of your body on the floor. You start out in a standing position and then put your hands and legs on the floor. Then, you jump up while raising your knees and bring your legs together before pushing yourself as high into the air as you can. This is a great way of working your abs, legs and upper body all at once.

The Burpee: The Various Techniques Used by the Pros at boxspiring.com

The Push-Up Burpee: This is a great way of working your entire body. It’s a little different than the other types of burpees in that you’ll start out in a push-up position rather than a standing position. The exercise then follows the same steps as the regular form of the burpee.

Find What’s Right For You

There are many different variations of this exercise, so you should mix things up every now and then by trying something new. Also, remember that you don’t have to do all of these and that you should always listen to your body. Do what feels right and most of all, have fun!

Burpees are a great way of working out your whole body and are a fantastic addition to any exercise routine. While they may seem simple at first glance, they’re actually quite challenging when done properly and can help give you the body you’ve always wanted.

Thanks for reading! If you’d like more information on this topic, I highly recommend the Strength Project’s eBook that was published on Amazon Kindle. It delves a lot deeper into these types of exercises and how you can use them to change your body in ways you never thought possible!

Also, if you’re looking for a personalized training program that will help you reach your goals 10x faster then check out the Strength Project. It’s what I used when I got back into working out and it’s the reason why I’m in the best shape of my life at the moment. Plus, if you enter in this discount code, thefirst100, you’ll get $30 off on your purchase.

Talk to you soon!

Happy Lifting!

Jake

The Strength Project

This article was researched and written by SelfProdigy, who is the owner and lead editor of selfimprovementsite.org. He is a rising junior in high school and has been involved in martial arts for over 10 years, as well as being an athlete his whole life. He has been weight training for three years and loves to learn about health and fitness.

The Burpee: The Various Techniques Used by the Pros at boxspiring.com

Here he shares some of his knowledge regarding this complex topic in ways we can all understand.

Sources & references used in this article: