box
The Floor Press vs the Bench Press

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press

The Floor Press Vs the Bench Press Ratio:

It is common knowledge that there are two types of exercises; those performed with weight and those without weight. There are many reasons why one might choose to perform such exercises without weight. One reason could be because it would require too much time or effort, another reason may be due to lack of equipment or not having enough space for additional equipment.

Another reason may be due to fear of injury from performing such exercise without any weights at all.

There are many benefits of performing exercises without weight. These include; reducing risk of injury, increasing flexibility and strength, improving mental focus and concentration, and more.

One benefit of performing exercises without weight is that you will increase your overall fitness level. You will have increased stamina which means you will be able to do more repetitions with less rest between sets. You won’t need as much sleep either since you’ll be able to get through longer workouts in less time.

Another benefit of performing exercises without weight is that you will be able to lift heavier weights which means you will be able to achieve greater results. Your body fat percentage will decrease as well since you’ll be lifting more weight and burning more calories doing so.

When it comes down to it, if you want to improve your physical health, then you should definitely start training without weights. If you’re looking for ways to lose excess body fat, then the same applies. You want to increase the intensity of your workouts without adding any additional weight.

The best exercises to do this are pushups, pull-ups, lunges, and dips.

People always ask what the differences are between a bench press and a floor press. For this article, we’re going to look at how they compare in terms of muscles worked, the amount of weight that can be used, image comparisons, and which style is better for building mass.

The bench press and the floor press are very similar. They both involve the same muscles, but there are some differences you should be aware of before choosing which one to do.

The first difference is that the floor press, obviously, is performed on the floor. This puts the wrists in a more natural position and can prevent injury. If you have ever had a wrist injury and tried to bench press, you know how much it affects your ability to lift.

The next difference is that when you lower the bar, you can lower it slower. This will put more of the focus on your chest, rather than your triceps. Another difference is that you can use less weight and still get a great workout.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press - Image

The final difference is that you can also do this exercise with one arm at a time. This works out both of your arms and can be a great way to isolate each one.

For proper form, you want to make sure that your feet are shoulder width apart and pointed straight ahead. You also want to make sure your back is completely straight and not arched backwards. This can cause strain on your lower back.

Some people like to put a small weight in their lap to make the exercise a bit harder, but this is purely optional.

Lower the bar until it touches your chest without touching your chin or neck. Push the weight back up until your arms are completely extended.

The goal of this exercise is to increase the amount of weight that you can do on the exercise, and to make sure you can do it properly to avoid injury.

While these exercises are excellent mass builders, they aren’t the only ones you should be doing. You should also be doing exercises that work each muscle groups in other ways. This will give your muscles a better shape and tone as opposed to just making them bigger.

Remember that muscles have three different types of fibers; red, white, and intermediate. Red fibers are slow twitch fibers that are resistant to fatigue. They provide stamina, but little strength or size.

White fibers are fast twitch fibers that provide a lot of strength and power, but tire quickly. Intermediate are a balance between the two.

You want to focus on building your red and white fibers for a balanced physique. This means that you need to perform high reps with lighter weights and low reps with heavier weights.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press from our website

For mass building, you still need to perform the exercises listed above, but also incorporate some other exercises such as overhead presses, deadlifts, barbell rows, and squats.

Overhead presses can be done with a bar or dumbbells. Your arms should be fully extended above your head and return back to that position once you’ve reached the top of the movement. Deadlifts are performed by picking a bar off of the floor and returning it back once you’re standing upright.

Barbell rows are similar to deadlifts except that you pull the weight up to your waistline. Squats are performed by sitting back and returning back to the standing position.

For toning, you should also perform high rep sets with light weights. Some examples of these exercises are leg raises, sit-ups, pullovers, and bent over rows.

Remember that these are just basic guidelines for building a balanced body. You may need to do more of one type of exercise to achieve your desired look. Everyone is different.

Also, don’t be afraid to take a day off once in awhile. You won’t lose any muscle by taking a break every once in awhile. It will actually help you achieve your goals faster by letting your muscles recuperate.

Now that you have a better understanding of weight training, you should be able to get the body you’ve always wanted! Good luck!

Glossary

Rep: A single repetition of an exercise.

Set: A grouping of multiple repetitions of an exercise. Three to five reps is considered a set.

Weights: Another word for free weights or weight plates.

Dumbbells: A pair of free weights that consist of a single weight at each end of a bar.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press at boxspiring.com

Barbells: A bar with weightsattached at even intervals to either end.

Machines: Devices that help lift heavy objects allowing only for the motion to be controlled by the manufacturer.

Aerobic: Pertaining to the need of oxygen by the body. Any type of physical activity that isnt anaerobic in nature.

Anaerobic: Pertaining to the lack of need of oxygen by the body. Any type of physical activity that requires short bursts of energy.

Fiber: The structural material of plants. In animals, it’s the material that forms tendons, ligaments, and muscles.

Glycogen: A substance that is stored in the liver and muscles full of glucose that can be burned as energy.

Lactic Acid: A substance that is produced when glycogen is burned. It causes the burning sensation in your muscles during exercise.

Interval Training: A method of exercising where a person burns at an high intensity for a specific interval and then rests or slows down to a lower pace for another interval then higher again.

Plyometrics: A method of exercise where one emphasizes jumping and hopping exercises to develop the muscles and increase their ability to do so.

Muscle Confusion: A method of exercise where a person changes their workout program on a regular basis so the body isn’t able to adapt to it.

Drop Set: A set where you lift a weight until failure or exhaustion is reached and then drop down respectively in weight and continue until all sets are complete.

Failure: The point in an exercise where you can no longer keep the desired motion going.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press | boxspiring.com

Burnout: A set where you lift a weight until failure or exhaustion is reached then increase the weight and lift the same amount of repetitions you did before reaching failure.

Spotter: A person who stands by in case you need help controlling the weight when lifting.

Grip: The manner in which one holds the weight.

Rack: The metal device used to store weights.

Clean: The manner in which one lifts the weight off of the rack and prepares to do a repetition.

Shoulder Rotation: Moving your arms in a circle so that your hands go behind your back.

Chalk: A powder substance usually made of magnesium carbonate that is often spread on ones hands to prevent them from slipping during exercises that require gripping such as the clean or bench press.

Warm-up Set: The first set of an exercise that is lighter than normal and is used to prepare the muscles for harder work.

Eccentric: The negative portion of an exercise where the muscle is actually being stretched and worked in a lengthened state.

Isometric: A method of exercise where one holds a position under tension but the muscle does not actually shorten like it would in an eccentric or concentric action.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press at boxspiring.com

Spotting: A person who stands by in case you need help controlling the weight when lifting.

Staggered Stance: The feet are positioned at an angle during squatting or deadlifting.

Barbell Row: A rowing motion that is performed while holding a barbell and bending over.

Glute Ham Raise: A lower body exercise where one hammers their legs back and forth using momentum to lift their own body weight.

Strict: Done with precise form and no additional momentum.

Isolation: A term used in weight training to signify that the muscle is worked out without any assistance from other groups. So for instance if you did a bicep curl you would be working just the bicep since the rest of the arm is not moving. However, an exercise like tricep pushdowns would be considered isolation since you are focusing on just the tricep muscle.

Staggered: A foot position where one foot is forward and the other is back. So when you are standing with your feet together the left foot would be forward and the right foot back.

Toes Out: A stance where the toes are pointed outwards, this is usually done to emphasize the outer (lateral) head of the quadriceps. So during a leg extension for instance you would point your toes outward rather than straight forward.

Toes In: A stance where the toes are pointed towards each other, this is usually done to emphasize the inner (medial) head of the quadriceps. So during a leg extension for instance you would point your toes toward each other rather than straight forward.

Static: A type of isometric where the body part doesn’t move at all, but rather stays in a fixed position.

Oblique: A muscle on either side of the torso that helps with twisting and rotation.

Explosive: A term used to signify that the weight is moved quickly through a full range of motion. For instance a vertical jump would be considered an explosive movement.

In-Out: A stance where the feet are placed together and then spread apart in order to emphasize the inner (medial) head of the quadriceps. So during a leg extension for instance you would point your toes toward each other and then apart rather than straight forward.

Isolation Exercises: Isolate certain muscles in order to work them out with out any help from other groups.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press - Picture

12 Week Workout Program: This is a program for those who wish to maximize their muscle gain in the shortest time possible.

Lying Tricep Extension: This is a isolation exercise for the triceps that involves no other muscle groups. It’s usually done with barbells or dumbbells.

Standing Military Press: This is a compound exercise that works out the shoulder muscles and also aids in balancing the body. It’s usually done with a barbell.

Bench Press: This is a compound exercise that works out the chest muscles and also aids in balancing the body. It’s usually done with barbells.

Concentration Curl: A isolation exercise for the bicep muscles.

Bent Over Row: A compound exercise that involves rowing a barbell while bent over. It mainly works out the back muscles and also helps build up your core.

Dumbbell Fly: An isolation exercise for the chest muscles.

Tricep Pushdown: An isolation exercise for the triceps that involves no other muscle groups. It’s usually done sitting down and using a bar attached to a rope or cable.

One-Arm Dumbbell Row: A compound exercise that involves rowing a dumbbell while standing, it mainly works out the back muscles and also helps build up your core.

Dumbbell Kickback: An isolation exercise for the triceps that involves no other muscle groups. It’s usually done sitting down and using a dumbbell.

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press at boxspiring.com

Seated Calf Raise: This is a isolation exercise for the calf muscles which are located on the back of your lower legs. It involves using your bodyweight as resistance by raising your body up on your “toes”.

Don’t Be a Jacked Hunter: NEVER use this as a substitute for real exercise. Beating the hell out of a bunch of monsters is one thing but you still need to do some cardio work and actual weight lifting in order to stay in shape.

This program is only to be used as a guide.

You may also exercise as a group to keep from getting bored and encourage each other.

Now that you have your plan in place all you need are the tools. You should already have most of the tools needed, all you really need to buy are some dumbbells and maybe an inexpensive barbell set unless you already have one.

The Program

This is a very simple program that alternates between full body workouts and isolation workouts. You will work out four days a week. It’s recommended that you not do any other strenuous activity on the days that you work out.

You may also want to consider eating a bit more than you usually do during this training period since your body will be burning up a lot more calories. However, you don’t want to go overboard and eat too much since you still want to remain as mobile as possible.

Here are some guidelines for the eating plan:

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press from our website

Eat Breakfast within one hour of waking up.

Eat a healthy breakfast even if you’re not hungry ( Eat something whether you’re hungry or not because you never know when you’ll be able to eat again ).

Try to eat every 2-3 hours after that.

Eat healthy even when not working out or if you’re sick.

No refined sugars or carbohydrates (Meaning no candy, cake, ice cream, soda or any other junk/fast foods).

Choose healthy fats and proteins.

Drink plenty of water and milk.

Don’t eat anything after dinner unless it’s dairy.

You may have 1 “cheat day” per week (This is your reward day so don’t overdo it).

You can also do light exercise on cheat day as well since you’ll be burning a lot more calories.

Full Body Workout

Perform each of the following exercises for 3 sets of 10 repetitions (Rest 1-2 minutes between sets).

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press - Picture

Weight Workout

Perform each of the following exercises for 3 sets of 8 repetitions (Rest 2-3 minutes between sets).

Isolation Workout

Perform each of the following exercises for 4 sets of 12 repetitions (Rest 1-2 minutes between sets).

One-Arm Barbell Curl: 1 Arm at a time

Side Lateral Raise: Stand sideways next to the bench so you can lean your body on the bench while doing this exercise.

Triceps Pushdown: Use a straight bar attached to a cable. This is done by holding the bar with both hands and bringing it down to your chest and then back up to starting position.

Reverse Grip Triceps Extension: A reverse grip is when your palms are facing you.

Incline Dumbbell Curl: Use a shorter bench that’s at a slight incline.

Wrist Roller: The handle should just be at mid-chest level when you take a grip on it.

Neck Workout

Perform each of the following exercises for 4 sets of 8 repetitions (Rest 1-2 minutes between sets).

The Floor Press vs the Bench Press - boxspiring.com

Neck Flexion: Slowly bring your chin towards your chest.

Neck Extension: Slowly tilt your head so you’re looking up towards the sky.

Side Bend: Keeping your head straight look over your shoulder until you feel a slight stretch. Then return to starting position and look forward. Do the same on the other side.

Sources & references used in this article: