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Training From The Hang Position

Training From The Hang Position

Training From The Hang Position (TFTH) is a training method developed by John Grimek, founder of Powerlifting USA. TFTH was designed to improve strength, hypertrophy and muscular endurance while reducing risk factors for injury.

The main goal of TFTH is to increase the amount of weight lifted at one time without increasing the number or intensity of repetitions performed. It works best when done twice per week during a period of 4 weeks.

The training program consists of two phases: Phase I and Phase II. The first phase is usually conducted on non-consecutive days. You perform a set of 10 reps, rest for 2 minutes, then do another set of 10 reps. Rest for 3 minutes before performing the next set.

For example, if you did a set of 5 reps, you would rest for 1 minute between sets and then start over with your next set until all ten repetitions have been completed. If you are unable to complete all ten repetitions within the allotted time, then rest for a few seconds and try again.

You may alternate between these two modes of training depending upon your current level of fitness. When doing TFTH, it is imperative that you keep your heart rate elevated and focus on lifting heavy weights.

For those who are already in good shape, Phase I: Workout A is more appropriate. In this case, you should also use a weight that is around 80% of your 1 rep maximum (1RM). For example, if you can bench press 300 pounds for 1 rep, then you should use 240 pounds for this particular exercise. It is important to keep accurate records of your workouts and adjust the weight that you lift accordingly.

For those who are not in good shape, you should use a lower weight but perform more repetitions than indicated above. In this case, you should also start with Phase I: Workout B. In both of these cases, you should adjust the weight that you lift and the number of repetitions you perform depending upon how your body feels on any given day.

Powerlifters and other strength enthusiasts sometimes add bands or chains to these exercises in order to increase the resistance at certain portions of the lifts. These additional forms of resistance have not been researched but may be useful as an addition to this program.

As you get stronger, you should increase the amount of weight that you lift. It is also important to keep good records of your workouts in order to analyze your improvements in strength.

In Phase II, you train four times per week (Mon/Wed/Fri/Sun). You should continue to keep your repetitions between 5 and 10 while also keeping the weight at or above 90% of your 1 rep maximum. For example, if you bench press 300 pounds for 1 rep, then you should use 180-230 pounds for this exercise. Again, it is important to keep accurate records of your workouts and adjust the weight that you lift accordingly.

During the non-workout days, you should perform low-intensity cardio. Walking on an inclined treadmill is a good form of exercise for this purpose. This type of exercise increases the number of capillaries in your body and improves blood flow throughout your body. In addition to keeping you fit, it also improves your recovery time after a workout.

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